September12014

mccallpack101 said: I'm trying to write a character who has manic-depressive disorder. Do you have any ideas on how to portray that?

thewritershelpers:

Okay, I’m going to start with a disclaimer. I’m going to share my personal experience with this disorder, and then provide some links where you can read more about it. I don’t pretend to be an expert.

Manic-depressive disorder is actually an outdated term. It’s now referred to as bipolar disorder. My brother was diagnosed when he was about eighteen. And while his bipolar can influence his behavior, it doesn’t take away traits that were always distinctly him.

Before and after his diagnosis, my brother has been a logical and meticulous individual. He loves puzzles, trivia, statistics, and he can be remarkably funny. He’s not one to tell you he loves you, but he’s very sweet and his desire to be near me and my sister shows us that he loves us. He’ll go through periods where all he’ll do is read, and sometimes he won’t pick up a book for months. He loves music and poetry. These are his qualities outside of the disorder.

My brother gets very antsy, and it’s rare that you’ll find him sitting down. He likes to pace and wander around. He’ll talk to you for a few minutes, go and do something, and then come back and talk a little more. He can talk very fast and loud, and no matter what the subject, he’s very passionate and articulate. A few minutes later, he can get very quiet. You can tell he’s thinking, because he’ll stand with his head down, forehead wrinkled in deep thought. Sometimes he can look angry during these periods, but I know he’s just got a lot going on in his head. It’s best not to engage him in a long conversation during these times. If you try to talk to him, he’ll give you brief, quiet answers, or sometimes he’ll go somewhere that he can be alone. These are his qualities that the disorder brings about.

My brother also fell victim to what is called “self medicating.” He became addicted to alcohol and marijuana. Addiction is another topic entirely, so I won’t go into that. But it is another potential complication in any form of depression, including this one. 

My brother’s bipolar disorder makes it difficult for him to hold onto a job. He can’t stay focused for hours at a time, nor can he interact with people for hours at a time. He can’t maintain the discipline it takes to work a job every day. Some individuals with bipolar disorder can, but this is something you’ll have to research and decide what will work best for your character. 

The important thing to remember is that individuals with mental disorders have personality traits outside of the disorder. So think about who your character is beforehand and then consider how the disorder will factor in. 

You can research it by googling, visiting your library, or look into the official description in the DSM-V. But I think you’ll get the greatest enlightenment by reading case studies. Here are some links:

Case Studies - Bipolar Disorder

The Case Study of Susie - Bipolar I Disorder

Bipolar Disorder Case Studies

Bipolar Disorder in an Adult Woman

Valproate (drug) in Bipolar Disorder: Case Examples

Overview of Bipolar with Case Studies

A Real Life Example of Living Triumphantly with Bipolar Disorder

Followers, if you’ve got your own personal experiences with this disorder, share them with the asker!

-R

August282014
maxkirin:

✐ DAILY WEIRD PROMPT ✐

THE ACCIDENTAL SUMMONER
Write a story from the point of view of a student with a ritual they have for preparing for finals. The catch? They made a change to this ritual recently. Double catch? This subtle change has made this ritual identical to that for summoning a particular type of demon.

Want to publish a story inspired by this prompt? Click here to read the guidelines~ ♥︎ And, if you’re looking for more writerly content, make sure to follow me: maxkirin.tumblr.com!

maxkirin:

✐ DAILY WEIRD PROMPT ✐

THE ACCIDENTAL SUMMONER

Write a story from the point of view of a student with a ritual they have for preparing for finals. The catch? They made a change to this ritual recently. Double catch? This subtle change has made this ritual identical to that for summoning a particular type of demon.

Want to publish a story inspired by this prompt? Click here to read the guidelines~ ♥︎ And, if you’re looking for more writerly content, make sure to follow me: maxkirin.tumblr.com!

August262014
10AM

Music for Inspiration

The Fumes in the Raina mix for a dreary city, lit up in neon

Get Sh*t Donea playlist to get you through your work (and help you feel like a badass)

Writing: Suspense

Royalty and Noble Blood - A writing mix about feudal dynasties, bad blood, and royal turmoil.

Ambient Mixer - This is a great website if you just want ambient noise to fill the background while you write.

Big Damn (Anti)Heros"The antiheroine is a leading character in a story who lacks traditional heroic qualities such as idealism, courage, nobility, fortitude, moral goodness…"

Writing & Fighting - A mix for writers looking to jump right into the heat of battle! 

Better Men Have Hit Their Knees, Bigger Men Have DiedMusic for the girls who take on the world.

August122014

maxkirin:

[WRITING ABOUT HORROR] is a mix for writers haunted by the creatures that lurk in the shadows. This mix contains 16 of my favorite tracks for writing eerie tension, horror, and the moment just before that jump-scare. If you’re looking for unobtrusive writing music that can keep you on the edge of your seat, then you have come to the right place— wait, what’s that right behind you? No, don’t look!

It’s too late to turn back now…

♪ Listen to this mix on 8tracks ♪

Looking for more writing playlists? Check out my other mixes:

Oh, and if you want more writerly content, then follow my blog for your daily dose of prompts, advice, and writer positivity: maxkirin.tumblr.com!

(via trixdraws)

August82014
rphelper:

Common and Uncommon Mythical Creatures
As requested by nitxo, here is a list of mythical creatures and/or legendary species. Bolded are the most common, and italicised are the least common playable characters amongst roleplays and roleplayers according to my personal opinion and experience. I’ve also included a bit of interesting reads on mythical creatures at the end. If I left out a favourite of yours, don’t hesitate to message me.
Read More

rphelper:

Common and Uncommon Mythical Creatures

As requested by nitxo, here is a list of mythical creatures and/or legendary species. Bolded are the most common, and italicised are the least common playable characters amongst roleplays and roleplayers according to my personal opinion and experience. I’ve also included a bit of interesting reads on mythical creatures at the end. If I left out a favourite of yours, don’t hesitate to message me.

Read More

7AM
7AM

Anonymous said: Hello! Currently, I'm writing a story about werewolves. While I think I've put quite an original spin on it, I want to know if you have any tips for not being cliché/writing tropes/etc. Thanks for your time!

slitheringink:

Tropes are not necessarily a bad thing. A trope is a device or element of a story that a writer can reasonably expect most readers to recognize. A trope may become a cliché when it’s overused, though I am a firm believer in the philosophy: “it’s not the concept that matters but the execution”.

Here’s the TV Tropes page on Werebeast Tropes.

And here’s the one on Wolves.

Most of the werewolf clichés I can think of have to do specifically with werewolves and romance. I tried to come up with some other ones though:

  • Female lead falls in love with werewolf. Werewolf is the alpha, always the alpha. His fur is also black, because black is mysterious *wiggles fingers*. He’s also the only black wolf.
  • Male lead werewolf is always astonishingly beautiful, not rugged, or scarred or anything, because clearly werewolves don’t fight each other, nope, nope. Personally I like my werewolves a bit more gritty, Underworld style.
  • Surprise! The female lead is also a werewolf. She has white fur and has some sort of amazing power. Perhaps she sparkles in the sun… wait…
  • There’s a dog in the story. The dog is the only thing that recognizes the werewolf character is, in fact, a werewolf.
  • Remember that being a werewolf is an affliction. It’s become a thing recently in media to only portray them as people who can shapeshift. The part about the pain tends to get left out, and I think that’s what makes werewolves interesting and complex.
  • I’m pulling this one out of Twilight, but imprinting is creepy. I don’t think it’s a cliché yet, and I hope it doesn’t end up being used enough to become one.
  • Constant references to the moon, whether in speech or in another form, that try to elude to the fact that your character is a werewolf, but ends up smacking the reader in the face instead.
  • When a character watches a werewolf transform and ends up standing there instead of running, shooting, or doing anything other than staring, even if that character already knew beforehand who the werewolf was, and shouldn’t be surprised.
  • Werewolves, and what constitutes the symptoms of being a werewolf as far as popular culture is concerned, are known well enough by the general public to be recognizable. I dislike when a character notices there are symptoms and then goes to look them up as if they have never heard of a werewolf before.
  • Werewolves not actually using their wolf instincts — otherwise known as “werewolves who should know better doing stupid things and not thinking like the predators they are”. This includes getting caught in traps, not using their keen senses to avoid danger, running straight at someone with a weapon, etc.
  • Magical Native American werewolves. Both cliché and offensive.
  • When a character becomes a werewolf and suddenly loses his memory of the transformation once he’s human again. Or ends up in the forest naked.

I wouldn’t consider most of the actual werewolf lore to be necessarily cliché though.

  • Full Moon Transformations - This became part of the werewolf lore when The Wolfman was introduced in the 1940s. A lot of writers use the full moon as the point of transformation for a werewolf character because it’s convenient. I’ve seen some instances where the werewolf character feels the pull of the moon whenever it’s out, not just when it’s full. There’s also been a ton of garbage pseudoscience used to attempt to explain how the relationship between werewolf and moon works, and most of the time it just ends up being confusing. There are stories that have full moon transformations and werewolves who can shift whenever they please, so it makes the full moon seem unnecessary. I’d like to see some more original concepts and/or executions of werewolf transformations. You may want to consider using the entire lunar cycle.
  • Weaknesses - Some commonly accepted/used lore weaknesses are: silver, wolfsbane, lunar eclipses (losing their power), losing themselves to their curse, and decapitation/dismemberment.
  • Different Forms - Werewolves have taken many different forms, including: Half man/half wolf, giant wolves, normal wolves, anthro (garou, the form we’re used to seeing), and everywhere in between. Feel free to be creative with the level of transformation your werewolves can attain. These forms may provide the werewolf with different abilities like increased speed, strength, enhanced senses, etc.
  • It’s a Curse, Damn it - Becoming a werewolf is often caused by the infected bite or scratch from someone who is already a werewolf. The transformation is painful, personal, and the fear of losing oneself to the beast is present. 
  • Pack Mentality - Werewolves, like actual wolves, have some sort of pack connection, and a pack hierarchy. As such, they may also form a bond with a dog or actual wolf that becomes a companion. With this part of the lore, sometimes the concept of having a mate comes into play, and sometimes it steps in to the territory of being cliché as a lot of writers handle it as “my mate is my destined true love”.

That’s all I have for now. I hope that’s useful to you.

-Morgan

July262014
thewritewire:

I’m not a big fan of adjectives, but it’s food for thought.

thewritewire:

I’m not a big fan of adjectives, but it’s food for thought.

(via thewritershelpers)

8AM
referenceplate:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

This is something I definitely needed to hear right about now. Makes me want to storyboard!

referenceplate:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

This is something I definitely needed to hear right about now. Makes me want to storyboard!

(via whatreference)

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