September162014

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

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BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

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AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

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AND STILL MORE

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SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

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PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

(via heartsways)

10AM

maxkirin:

Hello, writerly friends~ ♥︎

You asked for a Writing Advice Masterpost, so here it is! Below you will find a collection of the best questions and answers from the last two years. Not only that, but they are also organized so you can find the answers to your questions quickly and get on with writing.

But wait, there is more!

This post is more than just a collection of advice, it’s a nexus for writing advice, resources, and information! That’s right, this post is going to grow over time. I will be updating this masterpost WEEKLY with new answers, writing advice videos, playlists, and more! So, make sure to bookmark this page and follow my blog (maxkirin.tumblr.com) so you don’t miss a thing~ ♥︎

Writing Advice Compilations

Prompts

Virtual Writing Academy

Motivation & Inspiration

Planning, Outlining, and Getting Started

Dialogue

Editing & Revision

Hot Button Issues

General Advice

Publishing

Writing Music & Playlists

Miscellaneous

Last Updated: 09-13-14. Click HERE to see the latest update. Latest posts are in Italics.

(via maxkirin)

10AM
referenceforwriters:


S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.
Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 
The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.
Common Setting Failures
The Senses and World Building
Fantasy World Building Questions
Tips on Revealing Setting
The Rules of Quick and Dirty World Building
The Description Pyramid
Physical Descriptions Put Readers Into Place
Location, Location, Location
Creating Your Own World
Imagery
-Alex

referenceforwriters:

S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.

  • Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
  • Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
  • How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
  • The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
  • Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 

The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.

-Alex

(via writeworld)

10AM
10AM
macapan:


Limits of the Human Body by Soda Pop Avenue

Credit goes to SPA, but I wanted this here for a writer’s reference. This way we know exactly how far we can push our characters ;)

macapan:

Limits of the Human Body by Soda Pop Avenue

Credit goes to SPA, but I wanted this here for a writer’s reference. This way we know exactly how far we can push our characters ;)

(via avajae)

10AM
September92014

Advice: Horror Stories

writing-questions-answered:

10AM

A weird thing I find incredibly helpful for art/writing.

heecawroo:

deadcantdraw:

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

image

Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

image

It makes describing generic homes so much easier.

thank you

(Source: eplans.com, via justaddfiction)

10AM

Anonymous said: Hi :) This has been answered before, but! Can you please list all the different povs, but actually include examples sentences instead of books, because I don't have access to them. If you could add a few example sentences for each pov that would be so good? Thankyou

thewritingcafe:

10AM
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